Category Archives: News

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Photo Of The Day By NewmanImages

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Eclipse Over Wizard Island” by NewmanImages. Location: Crater Lake National Park, Oregon.
Photo By NewmanImages

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Eclipse Over Wizard Island” by NewmanImages. Location: Crater Lake National Park, Oregon.

“The partial eclipse from Crater Lake National Park in southern Oregon.”—Sue Newman

See more of NewmanImages at newmanimages.smugmug.com.

Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage, FacebookTwitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

The post Photo Of The Day By NewmanImages appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

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No More Excuses

No More Excuses

As the years go on, I’ve experienced and witnessed something very disturbing. While not always true, I’ve seen the work ethic that was so strong when I was young diminish. I’ve discussed what has been labeled the “Entitlement Generation” with many people of all ages, and there’s an overwhelming agreement it exists—even with those who are part of the Entitlement Generation! If you’re part of it, if you succumb to it, and you’re a photographer, I implore to make No More Excuses and encourage you to become part of the Just Do It generation. Photographers who make excuses don’t often come back with winning photos. My prescription: rest up, read what’s below three times a day, drink plenty of it, and call me in the morning.

Excuse #1: The Light Is Soooooo Flat I Can’t Get Any Good Pictures. The alarm wakes you at 5:15 AM because you read that sunrise light is dramatic. You wake up with just a bit of reluctance. This is a step in the right direction from you feeling entitled to sleep till noon. You actually get excited because you know you need to be on location for early light. Upon arrival, clouds dominate the eastern horizon and the light is flat. Those from the Entitlement Generation may gripe and moan, but you’ve graduated from those ranks and cheer the flat light! “Why the cheers?” you ask? Because there’s a world of photos that await you. No more excuses that you can’t get a great image on an overcast day. Think small and think macro. View your surroundings with telephoto eyes and look down at the ground for potential subjects. A plethora of pictures await the photographer who’s not looking for excuses. Your goal of capturing the grand landscape needs to shift to subjects that are more intimate. The territory to explore may be no more than a few square feet of real estate but net an amazing end result. The point is that if you begin your session with Plan A, be prepared for Plan B or maybe C. The challenge is to walk away with good images no matter the conditions. It’s not the number of pictures you make during a session that dictates its success. It’s the number of keepers you bring back. Thomas Edison once said, “Success is 10 percent inspiration and 90 percent perspiration.” Break a sweat and make No More Excuses.

No More Excuses

Excuse #2: No Photos Today—It’s Toooooo Cold. (Now say it with a whine…sounds nasty doesn’t it?) Snow is an ingredient that has numerous advantages. It covers the land in a blanket of white, which hides distractions, rubble, dirt and other undesirable elements. When sunrise or sunset reflects off its surface, images come alive. But associated with snow is cold weather. For all you Entitled Generationers, that’s why they make cold weather gear, boots, chemical warmers and fleece. If you choose to remain a fair weather photographer, other than the fact you miss out on snow scenes, you also deprive yourself of longer shooting sessions. During the winter, the sun stays low on the horizon for longer periods of time. Lower sun angles mean better light for longer periods. So strap on your gaiters, break out the pocket warmers, grab your fleece and head out in winter to make some great shots.

No More Excuses

Excuse #3: But It’s Soooooo Heavy! (How many of you said it with a whine?) What else could I be referring to other than a tripod? A tripod should be every photographer’s best friend for many reasons—more than the fact it helps make a sharp photo. Your tripod should be beefy enough to provide sharp images with your longest lens. A flimsy one isn’t worth its weight in dirt. A substantial tripod may be heavy and somewhat of a chore to carry, but if you return from an outing and every photo isn’t sharp, it was a waste of time to carry it anyhow. Accept the fact that it’s SOOOOOOOO heavy and deal with it. Another benefit of a tripod is it allows you to study the composition with more comfort. Since it supports the weight of the camera, it frees your mind to think more deeply about where to point the camera to create the best composition. It also forces you to slow down since you can study the viewfinder with greater scrutiny. An additional benefit is it allows you to get in the photo if you use the self-timer. Finally, it allows you to more easily shade your lens against flare. You can move to the front of the camera and block the light that causes it. So with all these positive factors, learn to love your tripod even though it’s SOOOOOOO heavy!

Visit www.russburdenphotography.com for information about his nature photography tours and safari to Tanzania.

The post No More Excuses appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

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Get the most out of your Windows 10 taskbar with these customization tips


The Windows 10 experience is anchored by the taskbar. It provides an information-packed reference point for your workflow, but not every desktop serves the same purpose. Here are a few customization tips that’ll show you how to move, resize, and customize the taksbar to suit your needs. With the myriad of different display configurations supported by Windows 10 it’s possible you’re going to end up wishing the taskbar was somewhere else. The taskbar can be oriented top, bottom, right, or left simply by left-clicking and dragging it. I’ve heard complaints that some users find themselves unable to drag the taskbar…

This story continues at The Next Web

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Na Zdorovie: Doing business with Russians explained


Former British Prime Minister Winston Churchill once famously said: “Russia is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma.” Even though Russia has undergone extraordinary political and cultural transformations and successfully embraced Western-style capitalism after the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, many people in the West still regard Russian business culture as very mysterious, incredibly intricate and difficult to understand.  I am originally from Russia and currently live in Moscow, although previously, I studied, worked and lived in France and the UK. I now work for a Russian tech company and mostly deal with foreign colleagues from…

This story continues at The Next Web

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PSA: Bigger smartphone apertures don’t count if the sensors get smaller


In the past few years, smartphone manufacturers have started paying more attention to the optics they use on their smartphone, using wider apertures for better low light performance. That’s awesome, but as a photographer, I have an ongoing gripe about the marketing buzz around apertures: An aperture tells you little about performance if you don’t know the camera’s sensor size. As a refresher, all else being equal, wider apertures (a lower number) mean better low light performance and shallower depth of field (more background blur or ‘bokeh’). The problem with smartphone photography is that rarely is everything else equal, sensor…

This story continues at The Next Web

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Full video: Inside the payments industry with Stripe co-founder John Collison at the GeekWire Summit

They may not know it, but anyone who has backed a company on Kickstarter or taken a Lyft is engaging with Stripe.

The company provides the online payments backbone for Twitter, Kickstarter, Shopify, Salesforce, Lyft and more than 100,000 other companies. The company’s co-founder, John Collison, was interviewed earlier this month by Axios Chief Technology Correspondent Ina Fried at the 2017 GeekWire Summit about the progress Stripe has made in just a few short years.

The company was in 2009 and based in San Francisco, and it is expanding rapidly in Seattle. Collison said the company has plans to grow to about 100 people by next year in the city.

Stripe is shaping up to be like the Amazon Web Services of mobile payments. The company represents an indispensable part of an array of consumer-facing services that operates behind the scenes. And it is heading in a similar direction, starting off with basic services and expanding into other areas, like how AWS started off with storage and now offers dozens of computing services to its customers.

In Stripe’s case, it is adding business services like fraud detection, analytics tools, and even helping people incorporate a business starting from scratch.

Watch the full interview with Collison from the GeekWire Summit above.

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What paddleboarding has taught me about being a balanced entrepreneur


If I told you that I credit paddleboarding to my success in entrepreneurship, you’d probably laugh me out of the boat, or the board — and I wouldn’t blame you! Founding and running a successful business requires many skills, and propelling one’s self on a board in Miami waters is decidedly not the first one that comes to mind. That said, as an entrepreneur, I get a lot out of my hobbies. They help me unwind, disconnect, and get my blood and brain pumping in new ways, making me a better leader when I am on the clock. I take…

This story continues at The Next Web

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Beer lovers, take note: University of Washington lab brews up a new way to make paper

UW beer paper
Kurt Haunreiter, the lab manager in the University of Washington’s Paper and Bioresource Science Center, holds up some of his spent beer grain paper. (GeekWire Photo / Kurt Schlosser)

There were pretzels and there was a guy dressed in lederhosen. But the only sign of beer at this Oktoberfest event, of sorts, was the spent grain from the brewing process that was being used to make paper.

In the bowels of Bloedel Hall on the University of Washington campus in Seattle, Kurt Haunreiter runs the Paper & Bioresource Science Center in the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences. Dressed like he was headed to tip a pint, or four, Haunreiter got in the spirit of the season last week during a demonstration of the possibilities when it comes to paper making.

It’s a craft he learned after 25 years working in the pulp paper industry, including many at the Kimberly-Clark paper mill in Everett, Wash. In his third year at the UW, Haunreiter encourages students to find interesting ways to displace wood fiber in their paper products — and spent beer grain is one of them.

“There’s not a lot of economic benefit to the microbreweries,” Haunreiter said of the brewing byproduct, which often goes to farms as cattle feed. “Being that we’re part of the bioresource program here, not just paper, I looked at, ‘How can we take advantage of something like that and incorporate it into paper making?’ The beer grain is not real strong, it doesn’t impart great characteristics, it’s more of an artisan paper.”

UW beer paper
Beer paper is way easier to make when you dress the part. (GeekWire Photo / Kurt Schlosser)
Beer paper
Students in the paper lab at the UW help run the machine producing paper made from spent beer grain. (GeekWire Photo / Kurt Schlosser)

With the paper machine humming in his basement lab and three or four students helping out, Haunreiter’s finished product did indeed look like something you might scroll a nice note on, especially to a friend who likes beer (the best kind of friend).

He said the paper was suitable as “communication paper,” meaning it could be run through a laser or ink-jet printer. With 20 percent of the wood fiber displaced by spent beer grain, Haunreiter called it a “nice strong sheet” and figured that a later run on the machine, in which he planned to “up the basis weight,” could produce a business card stock.

It’s the second time Haunreiter has run brewer’s byproduct through his paper maker. “We do a lot of contract work,” he said of the Paper Center. “So I don’t always get to do my projects.”

beer paper
The paper has an artisan look, as little pieces of the spent beer grain can be seen in the finished product. (GeekWire Photo / Kurt Schlosser)

And for Haunreiter and his students, it’s not just a gimmick to get the teacher to don a Bavarian hat. The hope is to attract incoming freshmen who might be curious about the mix of beer and paper, and stop by the lab. There’s also real science being applied, and Haunreiter speaks quickly, throwing out paper-making terms over his loud machinery.

“I have to watch the chemistry,” he half shouts. “A lot of non-wood fibers will be very anionic. Paper makers don’t like a lot of anionic — they have a name for that, it’s called trash. But in our case, the anionic charge is coming from the furnish that we want. I adjust the chemistry ahead of time, because if it’s too anionic the fibers won’t bond to each other.”

There are other paper makers in the world using a similar process, and generating results on a larger scale. Gmund is a German company that makes communication papers, and Ingrain of Santa Barbara, Calif., makes packaging and brand materials such as beer coasters.

Haunreiter gets his spent grain from Big Time Brewery, a craft beer maker in the University District that has been around since 1988. But holding the paper up to one’s nose doesn’t really produce the desire to ingest it like, say, a glass of ale would.

“It will smell more like bread, not beer. We were surprised at that,” Haunreiter said. “But it’s the texture we want. Unfortunately you still get the husks, and that will interfere with printing and usability, but our end user is looking for an artisan paper, and that’s what we’re trying to go for.”

beer paper
It was like a little craft brewery inside the UW paper lab — plenty of pretzels, but only root beer. (GeekWire Photo / Kurt Schlosser)

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Week in Review: Most popular stories on GeekWire for the week of Oct. 15, 2017

Get caught up on the latest technology and startup news from the past week. Here are the most popular stories on GeekWire for the week of Oct. 15, 2017.

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Most popular stories on GeekWire

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